Close enewsletter form

Register for Our Enewsletter

Sign up for the Wiley Education Services free quarterly enewsletter to receive updates and higher education industry news.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

By submitting your information, you agree to the processing of your personal data as per Wiley's privacy policy.

Emergency Remote Learning Satisfaction

Infographic: Emergency Remote Learning Satisfaction for Students and Instructors

The sudden shift to remote teaching in Spring 2020 presented new challenges for both students and faculty. So, how satisfied were these groups with the result? Wiley Education Services surveyed 4,280 students and 499 faculty from seven universities to determine just that. Let's take a look at the differences between students and faculty.

Click the image below to view the full infographic.

 

SURVEY QUESTIONS — STUDENTS:

Q1: Rate satisfaction with remote learning that replaced face-to-face learning:

  • 55% - Satisfied
  • 10% - Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
  • 35% - Dissatisfied

Q2: Comparing Spring 2020 to past terms, as a result of the pandemic and remote learning, do you think you:

  • 4% - Learned much better than you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 7% - Learned somewhat better than you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 15% - Learned as well as you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 28% - Somewhat did not learn as well as you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 45% - Definitely did not learn as well as you would have if the course format hadn’t changed 

Q3: Rate the effectiveness of learning class material in courses taken remotely due to the pandemic:

  • Direct one-on-one contact with instructor:
    • 23% - Extremely effective
    • 30% - Very effective
    • 24% - Moderately effective
    • 16% - Slightly effective
    • 7% - Not effective at all
  • Live video call/lecture (Zoom, etc.):
    • 20% - Extremely effective
    • 26% - Very effective
    • 29% - Moderately effective
    • 17% - Slightly effective
    • 8% - Not effective at all
  • Prerecorded lectures:
    • 18% - Extremely effective
    • 25% - Very effective
    • 25% - Moderately effective
    • 21% - Slightly effective
    • 11% - Not effective at all
  • Digital reading materials, digital textbooks, and textbook websites:
    • 11% - Extremely effective
    • 21% - Very effective
    • 31% - Moderately effective
    • 26% - Slightly effective
    • 12% - Not effective at all
  • Discussion boards:
    • 8% - Extremely effective
    • 14% - Very effective
    • 26% - Moderately effective
    • 29% - Slightly effective
    • 23% - Not effective at all
  • Other:
    • 9% - Extremely effective
    • 8% - Very effective
    • 15% - Moderately effective
    • 26% - Slightly effective
    • 43% - Not effective at all

SURVEY QUESTIONS — FACULTY:

Q1: Rate satisfaction with remote teaching implemented to replace face-to-face teaching:

  • 77% - Satisfied
  • 4% - Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied
  • 21% - Dissatisfied

Q2: Comparing Spring 2020 to past terms, as a result of the pandemic and remote learning, do you think your students:

  • 1% - Learned much better than you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 5% - Learned somewhat better than you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 34% - Learned as well as you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 37% - Somewhat did not learn as well as you would have if the course format hadn’t changed
  • 24% - Definitely did not learn as well as you would have if the course format hadn’t changed

Q3: Rate the effectiveness of methods used to teach remotely due to the pandemic:

      • Direct one-on-one contact with instructor:
        • 34% - Extremely effective
        • 39% - Very effective
        • 18% - Moderately effective
        • 8% - Slightly effective
        • 0% - Not effective at all
      • Live video call/lecture (Zoom, etc.):
        • 29% - Extremely effective
        • 34% - Very effective
        • 26% - Moderately effective
        • 8% - Slightly effective
        • 0% - Not effective at all
      • Prerecorded lectures:
        • 22% - Extremely effective
        • 28% - Very effective
        • 37% - Moderately effective
        • 11% - Slightly effective
        • 0% - Not effective at all
      • Digital reading materials, digital textbooks, and textbook websites:
        • 26% - Extremely effective
        • 35% - Very effective
        • 27% - Moderately effective
        • 9% - Slightly effective
        • 0% - Not effective at all
      • Discussion boards:
        • 15% - Extremely effective
        • 24% - Very effective
        • 25% - Moderately effective
        • 24% - Slightly effective
        • 12% - Not effective at all
      • Other:
        • 24% - Extremely effective
        • 32% - Very effective
        • 28% - Moderately effective
        • 12% - Slightly effective
        • 0% - Not effective at all

GRAPHICS:

G1:

I received/was able to provide timely feedback on assignments.

Students: 60%
Faculty: 86%

Setting deadlines for coursework is crucial for both instructors and students, while constructive, timely feedback keeps concepts fresh in students’ minds.

G2:

I felt my instructors were/I was actively involved in learning.

Students: 62%
Faculty: 70%

Proactive communication from instructors, such as class-wide announcements, keeps students engaged and alert. Be sure to use a variety of communication methods, including highlighting standout students and personally assisting those having difficulty.

G3:

I knew what was expected of me/I felt I set clear expectations.

Students: 57%
Faculty: 91%

Remote teaching requires a slightly different mentality, and a framework like the [Community of lnquiry] (https://edservices.wiley.com/foster-engagement-in-virtual-classrooms/) promotes quality interactions through social, cognitive, and teaching presence. Keeping students and instructors on the same page sets clear expectations for everyone.

CONCLUSION PARAGRAPH: Implementing emergency remote teaching was critical in order to continue learning during a pandemic. Both students and faculty agreed they were satisfied with the remote teaching implemented, and the majority felt they were actively involved and accessible while remotely learning and teaching.

For additional insights on making the transition to remote teaching, visit our [COVID-19 Faculty Support page](https://edservices.wiley.com/virtual-instruction-resources).

Source: Capranos, D. & Dyers, L. (2020). Pandemic Response Survey. Orlando, FL: Wiley edu, LLC.

Comments are closed here.

  • See how a partnership with Wiley Education Services can help you transform your university’s future by completing the form or calling us at 630-686-5330.
    Questions about textbooks?
    Please email sscteam@wiley.com.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

By submitting your information, you agree to the processing of your personal data as per Wiley's privacy policy.